Five things to know about the dispute over Nova Scotia’s Indigenous lobster fishery – CTV

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Five things to know about the dispute over Nova Scotia’s Indigenous lobster fishery – CTV

by ahnationtalk on October 21, 202033 Views

October 20, 2020

HALIFAX — Tensions remain high in the dispute over the Indigenous lobster fishery in Nova Scotia. Here are five things to know about the situation.

1. The dispute has a long history.

In September 1999, the Supreme Court of Canada affirmed the treaty rights of the Mi’kmaq, Maliseet and Passamaquoddy bands in Eastern Canada to hunt, fish and gather to earn a “moderate livelihood.”

The court decided that a Mi’kmaq fisherman from Cape Breton, Donald Marshall Jr., had the right to fish for eels and sell them when and where he wanted — without a licence.

That ruling was based on the interpretation of the Peace and Friendship Treaties approved by the British Crown in 1760 and 1761, which describe long-standing promises, obligations and benefits for the Crown.

Read More: https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/five-things-to-know-about-the-dispute-over-nova-scotia-s-indigenous-lobster-fishery-1.5153650

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