Books on aboriginal culture to be distributed in francophone schools

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Books on aboriginal culture to be distributed in francophone schools

by ahnationtalk on May 30, 2016212 Views

May 30, 2016

NEGUAC (GNB) – Books on aboriginal culture for students in Grades 1 to 6 will be distributed in francophone schools through a partnership between the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development and the publishing firm Bouton d’or Acadie.

“This initiative falls directly in line with the department’s efforts to respond to calls for action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on residential schools,” said Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Serge Rousselle. “The department is committed to ensuring that education in New Brunswick schools reflects the language, culture, history, and experiences of First Nations communities in our province.”

The six books that will be distributed belong to the Wabanaki Collection of Bouton d’or Acadie:

  • Glooscap, the Beavers and the Sugarloaf Mountain;
  • The Ice King;
  • Mighty Glooscap Transforms Animals and Landscapes;
  • How the Petitcodiac River Became Muddy;
  • Tihtiyas and Jean; and
  • A Little Boy Catches a Whale.

“The Wabanaki Collection helps children to develop positive attitudes such as openness, friendliness and respect for other cultures, without abandoning the values and beliefs of their own culture,” said Marie Cadieux, CEO of Bouton d’or Acadie. “By learning different perceptions and explanations of the world, including values and beliefs different from our own, it becomes easier to socialize and work with others.”

The content of each book is presented in three languages: English, French, and an aboriginal language (Mi’kmaq and Passamaquoddy). Each book tells a legend and is accompanied by an audio file that allows students to be exposed to an aboriginal language. A Teacher’s Guide was also produced to help with the achievement of learning targets in language and social studies. Next year, a project will be developed in Maliseet, an aboriginal language spoken in western New Brunswick.

NT5

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