Assembly of First Nations Welcomes Historic Decision by Human Rights Tribunal, Calls for Action Now to Achieve Fairness for First Nations Children and Families

    You can use your smart phone to browse stories in the comfort of your hand. Simply browse this site on your smart phone.

    Using an RSS Reader you can access most recent stories and other feeds posted on this network.

    SNetwork Recent Stories

Assembly of First Nations Welcomes Historic Decision by Human Rights Tribunal, Calls for Action Now to Achieve Fairness for First Nations Children and Families

by pmnationtalk on January 26, 2016310 Views

afnmulti_logo

January 26, 2016

Assembly of First Nations Welcomes Historic Decision by Human Rights Tribunal, Calls for Action Now to Achieve Fairness for First Nations Children and Families

(Ottawa, ON): Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde welcomes today’s decision by the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) for the federal government to jointly develop a new system of child welfare for First Nations on reserve and is calling for immediate action by the federal government to work with First Nations to ensure safety, fairness and equity for First Nations children and families.

In a highly anticipated decision released this morning, the CHRT states the Government of Canada has discriminated against First Nations children and families on reserve since the beginning of residential schools and requires the federal government to work with parties to the case to identify a process for remedy, which includes returning to the CHRT in coming weeks for an order on remedies.

“Today the kids win. Today the children are put first,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde.  “This ruling is nine years in the making.  That is a full generation of children waiting for justice and fairness, not to mention the decades of discrimination that has created the gap between First Nations and Canadians.   First Nations are ready to work together with the federal government to develop a new system of child and family services as directed by the CHRT, and this includes immediate relief funding for First Nations children and families and a new collaborative approach to a funding formula that is responsive to needs, reflective of regional diversity and respects fundamental human rights.  We cannot wait any longer to close the gap, and I look forward to seeing how the next federal budget will support safety, fairness and equity for First Nations children and families.”

In its decision released this morning, the CHRT found the federal government is discriminating against First Nations children and families on reserve by providing flawed and inequitable child welfare services for decades. The decision further states that the Government of Canada has failed to fully implement Jordan’s Principle, which is meant to ensure equitable access to government services available to other children in Canada.

The AFN is seeking immediate funding relief for First Nations children and families based on real needs and reflective of regional diversity and the establishment of an oversight mechanism to ensure equity and fairness are achieved, and maintained.

“The importance of this decision cannot be over-stated and we would like to thank AFN’s witnesses Elder Robert Joseph, Dr. Amy Bombay and Dr. John Milloy for presenting evidence on historic disadvantage resulting from Indian Residential Schools,” said AFN Manitoba Regional Chief Kevin Hart who is responsible for the child welfare portfolio at AFN.  “The AFN lifts up our partner in this work, Cindy Blackstock of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada, for her long-standing commitment and dedication to achieving equity for our kids. This is about our children, our families and our future, and we will be relentless in our efforts to ensure they have every opportunity to justice, fairness and success.”

“This is a great day for everyone who believes in fairness and justice for children” said Cindy Blackstock, Executive Director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada.  “The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s top call to action is to end the dramatic over-representation of Aboriginal children in foster care by reforming child welfare and ensuring equitable resources for culturally based services.  Today’s landmark decision signals an end to the federal government’s long and tragic history of discriminating against First Nations children in ways that needlessly separate them from their families. It is essential that the federal government immediately implement the ruling and end inequalities in other First Nations children’s services such as education, health and basics like water and housing.”

The AFN and the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society jointly filed the complaint to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal in February 2007 alleging the provision of First Nations child and family services by the Government of Canada was flawed, inequitable and thus discriminatory under the Canadian Human Rights Act.  The joint complaint states that the Government of Canada has a longstanding pattern of providing inequitable funding for child welfare services for First Nations children on reserves compared to non-Aboriginal children.  The impacts are many, including the staggering statistic that there are more First Nations children in care today than at the height of the residential schools system.  Hearings took place between February 2013 and October 2014 involving 25 witnesses and more than 500 documents filed as evidence

Internal federal government documents estimate the child welfare funding shortfall to be 34.8 percent and link this inequity to children going into foster care because their families are not provided equitable support services.

The federal government has 20 days from the date of decision to appeal.

For text the full CHRT decision please visit www.afn.ca

For more information suggested remedies please visit: https://fncaringsociety.com/first-steps-remedy-funding-inequities

—————————————————————-

Le 26 janvier 2016

L’Assemblée des Premières Nations salue la décision historique du Tribunal des droits de la personne et appelle des mesures immédiates de justice pour les enfants et les
familles des Premières Nations

(Ottawa, ON). Le Chef national de l’Assemblée des Premières Nations (APN), Perry Bellegarde, salue la décision rendue aujourd’hui par le Tribunal canadien des droits de la personne (TCDP), selon laquelle le gouvernement du Canada doit mettre en place un nouveau système de protection de l’enfance pour les Premières Nations dans les réserves et prendre des mesures immédiates pour travailler avec les Premières Nations en vue de garantir la sécurité des enfants et des familles et faire preuve d’équité et d’impartialité à leur endroit.

Dans une décision attendue de longue date et rendue ce matin, le TCDP statue que le gouvernement fédéral a fait preuve de discrimination à l’endroit des enfants et des familles des Premières Nations dans les réserves depuis la mise sur pied des pensionnats indiens et ordonne au gouvernement fédéral de travailler avec les parties dans cette cause en vue d’élaborer un processus pour déterminer des mesures correctives. Une nouvelle comparution devant le TCDP interviendra dans les prochaines semaines, alors que le Tribunal rendra une ordonnance relative aux mesures correctives.

« Aujourd’hui les enfants gagnent. Aujourd’hui la priorité leur est accordée », a déclaré le Chef national Perry Bellegarde. « Nous attendons cette décision depuis neuf ans. C’est toute une génération d’enfants qui attendent justice et impartialité, compte tenu des décennies de discrimination qui ont creusé l’écart entre les citoyens des Premières Nations et les Canadiens. Les Premières Nations sont prêtes à travailler avec le gouvernement fédéral à l’élaboration d’un nouvel éventail de services de protection de l’enfance, selon les directives du TCDP, et cet effort doit comprendre un financement d’urgence immédiat pour les enfants et les familles des Premières Nations, ainsi qu’une nouvelle approche collaborative en vue de l’élaboration d’une formule de financement axée sur les besoins, tenant compte de la diversité régionale et respectant les droits fondamentaux de la personne. Nous ne pouvons attendre plus longtemps pour éliminer l’écart et je suis impatient de constater de quelle façon le gouvernement fédéral, dans son prochain budget, soutiendra la sécurité, l’équité et l’impartialité vis-à-vis des enfants et des familles des Premières Nations. »

Dans sa décision rendue ce matin, le TCDP a statué que le gouvernement fédéral fait preuve de discrimination à l’endroit des enfants et des familles des Premières Nations dans les réserves en leur dispensant depuis des décennies des services déficients et inéquitables en matière de protection de l’enfance. La décision stipule en outre que le Canada a omis de mettre pleinement en œuvre le principe de Jordan, qui vise à garantir un accès équitable aux services gouvernementaux dont bénéficient les autres enfants au Canada.

L’APN appelle un financement d’urgence immédiat pour les enfants et les familles des Premières Nations, ainsi que la mise en place d’un mécanisme de surveillance pour garantir et préserver l’équité et la justice.

« On ne saurait trop insister sur la portée de cette décision et je tiens à féliciter celles et ceux qui ont témoigné au nom de l’APN, dont l’aîné Robert Joseph, la Dre Amy Bombay et le Dr John Milloy, qui ont soumis des preuves des désavantages récurrents découlant des pensionnats indiens », a déclaré Kevin Hart, Chef régional de l’APN au Manitoba et titulaire du portefeuille de la protection de l’enfance au sein de l’APN. « L’APN rend hommage à notre partenaire dans cette initiative, Cindy Blackstock, de la Société de soutien à l’enfance et à la famille des Premières Nations du Canada, pour son engagement et son dévouement de longue date dans la poursuite de l’équité pour nos enfants. Il s’agit de nos enfants, de nos familles et de notre avenir, et nous n’aurons de cesse de poursuivre nos efforts pour leur garantir justice et impartialité et assurer leur réussite. »

« C’est un grand jour pour toutes celles et tous ceux qui croient en l’impartialité et la justice pour les enfants », a pour sa part déclaré Cindy Blackstock, directrice exécutive de la Société de soutien à l’enfance et à la famille. « Le principal appel à l’action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation est de mettre fin à l’intolérable surreprésentation des enfants autochtones placés en famille d’accueil en réformant la protection de l’enfance et en allouant des ressources équitables pour des services culturellement appropriés. La décision historique rendue aujourd’hui met un terme à la tragique pratique discriminatoire de longue date du gouvernement fédéral à l’endroit des enfants des Premières Nations, dont un grand nombre ont sans raison été séparés de leur famille. Il est impératif que le gouvernement fédéral mette immédiatement en œuvre cette décision et remédie aux inégalités frappant d’autres services dispensés aux enfants des Premières Nations, tels que l’éducation et la santé, ainsi que des services essentiels tels que l’eau et le logement. »

En février 2007, l’APN et la Société de soutien à l’enfance et à la famille des Premières Nations ont conjointement déposé une plainte alléguant que les services à l’enfance et à la famille dispensés par le ministère des Affaires autochtones et du Nord étaient déficients, inéquitables, et donc discriminatoires en vertu de la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne. Cette plainte conjointe soutenait que le gouvernement du Canada avait depuis longtemps mis en pratique un modèle en vertu duquel le financement alloué aux services de protection de l’enfance dispensés aux enfants des Premières Nations dans les réserves était inéquitable lorsque comparé au financement des services destinés aux enfants non autochtones. Les répercussions sont nombreuses, telles qu’illustrées par la statistique affligeante selon laquelle les enfants des Premières Nations pris en charge sont aujourd’hui plus nombreux que lors de l’apogée du système des pensionnats indiens. Les audiences, au cours desquelles 25 témoins ont été entendus, se sont déroulées entre février 2013 et octobre 2014, et plus de 500 documents ont été déposés en preuve.

Des documents internes du gouvernement fédéral évaluent à 34,8 pour cent le manque de financement pour la protection de l’enfance et établissent un lien entre cette inégalité et les enfants placés en famille d’accueil parce que leurs familles ne bénéficient pas de services de soutien équitables.

Le gouvernement fédéral dispose de 20 jours pour en appeler de cette décision.

Pour prendre connaissance de l’intégralité de la décision du TCDP, veuillez consulter www.afn.ca.

Pour de plus amples informations sur les mesures correctives suggérées, veuillez consulter https://fncaringsociety.com/ fr/premières-étapes-pour-résoudre-les-inégalités-de-financement.

L’Assemblée des Premières Nations est l’organisation nationale qui représente les citoyens des Premières Nations au Canada. Suivez l’APN sur Twitter : @AFN_Comms, @AFN_Updates.

La Société de soutien à l’enfance et à la famille des Premières Nations du Canada est un organisme national sans but lucratif qui effectue des recherches, développe des politiques et offre du perfectionnement professionnel aux enfants, aux jeunes adultes, aux familles et aux organisations des Premières Nations.

-30-

Renseignements :

Jenna Young Castro, agente des communications de l’APN, 613-241-6789, poste 401, 613-314-8157 ou [email protected].

Alain Garon, agent des communications bilingue de l’APN, 613-241-6789, poste 382, 613-292-0857 ou [email protected].

Send To Friend Email Print Story

Comments are closed.

NationTalk Partners & Sponsors Learn More