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CBU Congratulates Chief Terry Paul on Being Named to the Order of Canada

Today, Cape Breton University is congratulating Chief Terry Paul of Membertou on being named to the Order of Canada.

A great friend, mentor and leader, Chief Terry has provided guidance to CBU as a member of the Shannon School of Business Advisory Board and is a strong proponent for the Purdy Crawford Chair in Aboriginal Business Studies. We are grateful for his dedication and commitment to CBU, which has further strengthened our delivery and successes of Aboriginal education and initiatives.

Chief Terry’s efforts in economic development and his successes have been recognized across North America and under his leadership, the First Nation community of Membertou has become a thriving community and regional economic driver.

In 2010, Chief Terry was awarded a Cape Breton University honorary degree, Doctor of Laws, honoris causa in recognition of his outstanding accomplishments and visionary leadership.

Today, Cape Breton University celebrates with him as he receives this most prestigious recognition.

Dr. Dale Keefe
President & Vice-Chancellor
Cape Breton University

NT5

Indigenous Artists of Red TeePee Creations make one-of-a-kind works for NBCC Gala

November 16, 2017

FREDERICTON – Gertrude Nicholas and Marlene Ward, owners of Red TeePee creations, started crafting dream catchers when they were in university. Every Saturday morning they would set up an outdoor stall at the Fredericton farmers market and sell their dream catchers. This budding business helped them cover the cost of their education.

Since that time, they have expanded their business to many other crafts and artworks, built their own shop on Indian Island, Kent County and work with several other local artists.

They are also thrilled to be using their crafting skills to support the next generation of Indigenous students in New Brunswick.

Ward and Nicholas are handcrafting the centrepieces for the upcoming Gelu’lg Maw-a-paw Indigenous Gala, hosted by the New Brunswick Community College (NBCC). The Gala evening will showcase Indigenous performers and artists while raising money for the NBCC Indigenous Bursary Fund.

Each centrepiece is unique and handcrafted using items collected from nature, such as driftwood, feathers, birch bark and beach glass. Gathering all the necessary materials has turned into a community-wide effort.

“Our next door neighbour is an elder, and she happened to be here when we first met about this project. She didn’t say she was going to help. She just walked in here on a summer afternoon, using the edge of her shirt to carry a small load of driftwood,” said Ward.

Many young people in their community also wanted to help collect items for the centrepieces. Some of them used the materials they collected to trade for treats from the small candy store Ward and Nicholas also run from their shop.

“There are three kids next door. They wanted to know exactly what we needed because they wanted to trade for gum,” said Ward. “So I explained I needed pieces with character. I wasn’t sure if they knew what that meant. But the things that they brought back, well their creativity really came through.”

Each artwork also tells a story about the college or Indigenous communities. Ward noted the work that means the most to her is the one representing missing and murdered Indigenous women. It features four hand-carved women, each wearing a red dress and standing around a small fire made of beach glass.

“That piece means a lot to me because we all have to talk about this issue more. There are a lot of missing and murdered Indigenous women, the system did not give them justice,” said Ward.

Nicholas meanwhile said the centrepiece depicting a father penguin has special meaning to her. It is a large piece of beaver-cut wood, carved in the shape of a penguin, sitting atop a down-covered chick.

“With the baby beneath and the father over top, it represents protection. It’s the father that takes care of the baby, to the detriment of his own life, he stays with the baby waiting for the mother to get back with the fish,” said Nicholas. “It’s amazing what they do. And it’s just such an amazing piece.”

Ward also credited Sheila Francis and Patrick Lachance, the other two artists who work with Red TeePee Creations, as essential in the creation of each of the centrepieces. LaChance is a retired social worker, while Francis still works fulltime as a Suicide Prevention Coordinator in Elsipogtog.

“My artists are the backbone of this project. They are so creative and rose to the challenge,” said Ward. “Patrick was our muscle, he did all the lifting and cleaning of the wood. Sheila is really creative and has an eye for this work. This has been a journey for us, together. We really connected and came together to reach our goal.”

Ward said she felt a personal connection to this project and to the Gala, noting the freedom she felt to create so many unique pieces of art and the fact that she was once a student who needed help.

“You know, I was once that student who needed help. My parents didn’t have the money for university. So I really know what its like to need that help to get through. That’s why I’m so proud to be part of this project.”

Each of their centrepieces will be displayed on the tables at the NBCC gala. The centrepieces will be given away to one winner at each table, as a thank you for supporting Indigenous students at NBCC.

The Gala is taking place Nov. 23, at the Delta Fredericton. The evening will feature, internationally renowned hoop dancer James Jones and several local Indigenous performers. The evening will also feature a silent auction, artists’ display and a seated dinner.

Tickets for the Gelu’lg Maw-a-paw Indigenous Gala can be purchased online at, NBCC.ca/Gala.

With over 90 programs and six campuses across New Brunswick, New Brunswick Community College (NBCC) is a provincially-recognized, public post-secondary institution reputed for producing skilled, knowledgeable graduates who are contributing to the Province’s socio-economic prosperity. NBCC offers students one- and two-year certificate and diploma programs.

-30-

Media contact:
Melissa Wah
Communications Coordinator, NBCC
Phone: 506.453.8194
Email: Melissa.Wah@NBCC.ca

NT5

Indigenous Artists of Red TeePee Creations make one-of-a-kind works for NBCC Gala

November 16, 2017

FREDERICTON – Gertrude Nicholas and Marlene Ward, owners of Red TeePee creations, started crafting dream catchers when they were in university. Every Saturday morning they would set up an outdoor stall at the Fredericton farmers market and sell their dream catchers. This budding business helped them cover the cost of their education.

Since that time, they have expanded their business to many other crafts and artworks, built their own shop on Indian Island, Kent County and work with several other local artists.

They are also thrilled to be using their crafting skills to support the next generation of Indigenous students in New Brunswick.

Ward and Nicholas are handcrafting the centrepieces for the upcoming Gelu’lg Maw-a-paw Indigenous Gala, hosted by the New Brunswick Community College (NBCC). The Gala evening will showcase Indigenous performers and artists while raising money for the NBCC Indigenous Bursary Fund.

Each centrepiece is unique and handcrafted using items collected from nature, such as driftwood, feathers, birch bark and beach glass. Gathering all the necessary materials has turned into a community-wide effort.

“Our next door neighbour is an elder, and she happened to be here when we first met about this project. She didn’t say she was going to help. She just walked in here on a summer afternoon, using the edge of her shirt to carry a small load of driftwood,” said Ward.

Many young people in their community also wanted to help collect items for the centrepieces. Some of them used the materials they collected to trade for treats from the small candy store Ward and Nicholas also run from their shop.

“There are three kids next door. They wanted to know exactly what we needed because they wanted to trade for gum,” said Ward. “So I explained I needed pieces with character. I wasn’t sure if they knew what that meant. But the things that they brought back, well their creativity really came through.”

Each artwork also tells a story about the college or Indigenous communities. Ward noted the work that means the most to her is the one representing missing and murdered Indigenous women. It features four hand-carved women, each wearing a red dress and standing around a small fire made of beach glass.

“That piece means a lot to me because we all have to talk about this issue more. There are a lot of missing and murdered Indigenous women, the system did not give them justice,” said Ward.

Nicholas meanwhile said the centrepiece depicting a father penguin has special meaning to her. It is a large piece of beaver-cut wood, carved in the shape of a penguin, sitting atop a down-covered chick.

“With the baby beneath and the father over top, it represents protection. It’s the father that takes care of the baby, to the detriment of his own life, he stays with the baby waiting for the mother to get back with the fish,” said Nicholas. “It’s amazing what they do. And it’s just such an amazing piece.”

Ward also credited Sheila Francis and Patrick Lachance, the other two artists who work with Red TeePee Creations, as essential in the creation of each of the centrepieces. LaChance is a retired social worker, while Francis still works fulltime as a Suicide Prevention Coordinator in Elsipogtog.

“My artists are the backbone of this project. They are so creative and rose to the challenge,” said Ward. “Patrick was our muscle, he did all the lifting and cleaning of the wood. Sheila is really creative and has an eye for this work. This has been a journey for us, together. We really connected and came together to reach our goal.”

Ward said she felt a personal connection to this project and to the Gala, noting the freedom she felt to create so many unique pieces of art and the fact that she was once a student who needed help.

“You know, I was once that student who needed help. My parents didn’t have the money for university. So I really know what its like to need that help to get through. That’s why I’m so proud to be part of this project.”

Each of their centrepieces will be displayed on the tables at the NBCC gala. The centrepieces will be given away to one winner at each table, as a thank you for supporting Indigenous students at NBCC.

The Gala is taking place Nov. 23, at the Delta Fredericton. The evening will feature, internationally renowned hoop dancer James Jones and several local Indigenous performers. The evening will also feature a silent auction, artists’ display and a seated dinner.

Tickets for the Gelu’lg Maw-a-paw Indigenous Gala can be purchased online at, NBCC.ca/Gala.

With over 90 programs and six campuses across New Brunswick, New Brunswick Community College (NBCC) is a provincially-recognized, public post-secondary institution reputed for producing skilled, knowledgeable graduates who are contributing to the Province’s socio-economic prosperity. NBCC offers students one- and two-year certificate and diploma programs.

-30-

Media contact:
Melissa Wah
Communications Coordinator, NBCC
Phone: 506.453.8194
Email: Melissa.Wah@NBCC.ca

NT5

GNB: Media Advisory – Infrastructure project

News Conference : Tobique First Nation : 20 November 2017, 11:00 AM

EDITOR’S NOTE: A news conference will be held to mark the opening of the new Tobique Generating Station fish passage at 11 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 20, at the Tobique Fisheries Building, 13046 Rte. 105, Tobique First Nation. NB Power president and CEO Gaëtan Thomas and Agriculture, Mines and Rural Affairs Minister Andrew Harvey will participate.

Media Contact(s)

Marc Belliveau, communications, NB Power,
506-458-4203, mbelliveau@nbpower.com.

NT5

Indigenous Entrepreneurship and First Nations Economic Development Opportunities Receive Support

November 17, 2017 – Fredericton, NB – Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

The Joint Economic Development Initiative (JEDI) provides a variety of programs and services focused on supporting Indigenous entrepreneurship, community economic development, workforce development, and partnerships with the public and private sector.

Thanks to investments of more than $2.2 million over two years from the federal and provincial governments, JEDI will continue to strengthen Indigenous participation in the New Brunswick economy. Funding will be provided for community economic development, entrepreneurship training and support, the Indigenous Internship Program, JEDI plenaries and communications as well as the ongoing Indigenous Business Accelerator Program.

TJ Harvey, Member of Parliament for Tobique-Mactaquac, on behalf of both the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister responsible for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) and the Honourable Jane Philpott, Minister of Indigenous Services, along with the Honourable Roger Melanson, Minister of Post-Secondary Education, President of Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Aboriginal Affairs, made the funding announcement today.

The Government of Canada is investing a total of over $2 million in this pan-provincial initiative including $1,024,690 from Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada with a portion of this funding via the Strategic Partnerships Initiative and $994,476 from ACOA’s Business Development Program. The Government of New Brunswick is also contributing $210,000 toward this initiative.

These investments build on the federal and provincial governments’ Atlantic Growth Strategy, which is designed to help Atlantic Canadian entrepreneurs compete internationally, grow their businesses and create jobs at home. One of the five pillars in the Strategy entails building a skilled workforce through immigration and labour market participation by underemployed Canadians, including under-represented groups such as Indigenous peoples, older workers, women, youth and persons with disabilities.

Quotes

“The Government of Canada is pleased to invest in JEDI to help build a stronger entrepreneurial community that fully involves Indigenous participation and stimulates greater economic opportunities throughout New Brunswick’s First Nations communities.”

– The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister responsible for ACOA

“Our Government continues to take steps to encourage job creation and economic growth for all Canadians and JEDI is a key partner in this goal. The Economic and Strategic Partnerships Initiative funding provides the support which will enable Indigenous businesses to take advantage of meaningful economic opportunities and create stronger business relationships via the Indigenous Business Accelerator Program.”

– The Honourable Jane Philpott, M.D., P.C., M.P., Minister of Indigenous Services

“First Nations communities are significant drivers of economic growth throughout New Brunswick. Our government values our relationship with First Nations Chiefs, community members and indeed our partnership with the Joint Economic Development Initiative. It is truly a pleasure to work with JEDI to create opportunities and foster economic development in First Nations communities.”

– The Honourable Roger Melanson, Minister of Post-Secondary Education, President of Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Aboriginal Affairs

“The Joint Economic Development Initiative has been working with partners to foster economic and workforce development for Indigenous peoples and communities in New Brunswick for over 20 years. This two-year Funding Agreement from ACOA and the Province of New Brunswick provides us with additional financial stability and allows us to focus our efforts on helping our Indigenous clients. The support that we receive from our funders is crucial to our continued work and carrying out JEDI’s vision of striving for full Indigenous participation in the New Brunswick economy.”

– Alex Dedam, President, Joint Economic Development Initiative

Quick Facts

  • Established in 1995, JEDI is a tripartite partnership implemented by Indigenous communities and the federal and provincial governments to identify and encourage undertakings designed to stimulate economic development in Indigenous communities within New Brunswick. The not-for-profit organization is a unique forum of open dialogue that brings together representatives from New Brunswick’s Indigenous communities, government, as well as the private sector.
  • This week, some 160 countries around the world are celebrating Global Entrepreneurship Week. Entrepreneurs are the backbone of the economy in Atlantic Canada. There are 85,000 small- and medium-sized enterprises operating in Atlantic Canada that make up over 99% of businesses in the region. These businesses provide the biggest potential for continued job creation and economic growth.

Contacts

Paul CJ LeBlanc
Senior Communications Officer
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
506-452-3310

Michael MacDonald
Communications Officer
Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
902-661-6318

Bonnie Doyle Creber
Communications
Intergovernmental Affairs & Post-Secondary Education
506-444-3158

Gwen McIntyre
Communications Manager
Joint Economic Development Initiative
506-261-3928

NT5

Charged with illegal fishing, Mi’kmaw man seeks to redefine Supreme Court’s Marshall decision – CBC

Civil action could have wide-reaching impact on Indigenous access to natural resources

Nov 17, 2017

Exactly 18 years after the Supreme Court of Canada issued a clarification of its ruling on Indigenous peoples’ right to fish, a Mi’kmaw fisherman from New Brunswick’s lawsuit against the Crown will be in court — hoping to clear it up again.

Legal counsel for Joseph Hubert Francis of Elispogtog First Nation in New Brunswick will appear in Halifax Federal Court Friday for the first part of the lawsuit filed in March of this year.

In 1999, the Supreme Court’s controversial ruling on R. v. Marshall affirmed a 240-year-old treaty right allowing Indigenous peoples to earn a “moderate livelihood” through commercial fishing in Atlantic Canada. After months of criticism from non-Indigenous fishermen, the court issued a clarification on Nov. 17, 1999, which reinforced the federal government’s power to regulate the fishery.

Read More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/hubert-francis-mi-kmaq-fishing-treaty-rights-lawsuit-1.4406156

President Russell receives Labradorian of Distinction Award!

November 16, 2017

A huge congratulations to President Russell on being presented with a Labradorian of Distinction Award during a ceremony hosted by Labrador MP Yvonne Jones in Port Hope Simpson on November 15.

He is among 150 deserving Labradorians (past and present) who were honoured across Labrador this week for their contributions to the cultural, economic, environmental and social betterment of Labrador and Canada.

We commend President Russell for the amazing work he does on behalf of Southern Inuit, NunatuKavut communities and NCC. We are extremely proud of you!

NT5

BR Women War Monument – CP

Source: The Canadian Press – Broadcast wire
Nov 17, 2017

HALIFAX – They sang and played accordion, knitted scarves and sewed quilts, and served up heaping plates of roast beef and potatoes to hundreds of hungry servicemen.

Now, more than 70 years later, Nova Scotia women and girls are being saluted for their volunteer work during the Second World War with a new monument on the Halifax waterfront.

The bronze sculpture, called “The Volunteers,” features three life-sized figures from three generations _ a young girl pulling a wagon full of salvaged metal, an African-Nova Scotian woman holding a tray of coffee and sandwiches, and an older woman seated with a Mi’kmaq basket and knitting.

Three women who volunteered in Halifax during the war unveiled the sculptures during a ceremony yesterday.

The sculptures are located just north of the Halifax Seaport Farmers’ Market on property donated by the Halifax Port Authority.

ked

(The Canadian Press)

INDEX: SOCIAL NATIONAL ARTS ATLANTIC POLITICS

 

Government of Canada invests in St. Peters Canal National Historic Site

St. Peters Canal Swing Bridge Officially Re-Opens to Public

November 16, 2017    St. Peter’s, Nova Scotia    Parks Canada Agency

Today the Government of Canada, along with community members from St. Peter’s and Potlotek First Nation, officially re-opened the new two-lane swing bridge at St. Peters Canal National Historic Site following the complete replacement of this iconic structure. Rodger Cuzner, Member of Parliament for Cape Breton—Canso and Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, participated in the ribbon cutting ceremony on behalf of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, Catherine McKenna.

This ceremony marks the completion of a more than $16 million federal infrastructure investment project to replace the swing bridge at St. Peters Canal National Historic Site. Public Services and Procurement Canada managed the project on behalf of Parks Canada. In 2016, work on the bridge began and included road realignment, widening from a one-lane to a two-lane bridge, an updated pedestrian walkway, and new signage. The completion of this project marks the end of a 14-month construction period.

As part of this project, new interpretive panels are currently being designed which will allow Canadians and visitors to better understand the cultures and histories of Indigenous Peoples in Canada. These panels are being developed in collaboration with Potlotek First Nation and will highlight elements of the region’s history and culture. Parks Canada is committed to a system of national heritage places that commemorates the contributions of Indigenous Peoples and their cultures, as well as how Indigenous Peoples take pride in being stewards of the land.

Parks Canada is responsible for protecting and presenting nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage. National historic sites reflect the rich and varied heritage of our nation and provide an opportunity for Canadians to learn more about our diverse history. By building strong connections to these places while working with community members far and wide, Parks Canada fosters stewards of tomorrow – people who know and care about our national treasures such as St. Peters Canal National Historic Site.

Investments in the preservation, rehabilitation, and restoration of our national parks and historic sites will protect our heritage and strengthen their appeal as destinations to celebrate our nation’s achievements. As we celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation, the Government invites all Canadians to experience and learn more about our environment and our history.

Quotes

“As we celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation, the Government of Canada is proud to invest in the protection and presentation of St. Peters Canal National Historic Site with the replacement of the St. Peter’s Swing Bridge. Through infrastructure investments at Parks Canada’s places, we are creating middle class jobs and driving economic activity while ensuring high-quality and meaningful visitor experiences for years to come. Working in partnership with the local Mi’kmaw community, new interpretive opportunities at this site will encourage the creation of new connections between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians and foster discussions on the histories, cultures, and realities of Indigenous communities.”

Rodger Cuzner,
Member of Parliament for Cape Breton—Canso and Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour

Quick Facts

  • Designated a national historic site in 1929, St. Peters Canal National Historic Site welcomes approximately 12,000 people per year. Thousands of vehicles cross the bridge each month and it swings open for more than a thousand boats each year.
  • Parks Canada is investing an unprecedented $3 billion over five years to support infrastructure work to heritage, tourism, waterway, and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas across Canada. This investment supports conservation efforts that will ensure these cherished places are protected and secured for the future.
  • Working together with more than 300 Indigenous communities across Canada, Parks Canada and Indigenous Peoples are partners in conserving, restoring, and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage.

Related Products

Associated Links

Contacts

Coady Slaunwhite
Public Relations and Communications Officer
Parks Canada Agency, Cape Breton Field Unit
902-217-0861
coady.slaunwhite@pc.gc.ca

Marie-Pascale Des Rosiers
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change
613-462-5473
marie-pascale.desrosiers@canada.ca

Media Relations
Parks Canada Agency
855-862-1812
pc.media@pc.gc.ca

NT5

Innu Nation ‘disappointed and embarrassed’ Ottawa won’t participate in foster care inquiry – CBC

Grand Chief Gregory Rich says federal government needs to be a part of planned review

Nov 16, 2017

The Grand Chief of the Innu Nation in Labrador says he’s “disappointed and embarrassed” by the federal government’s refusal to participate in an upcoming inquiry about Innu children in foster care.

Plans for an inquiry were announced by the Newfoundland and Labrador government in July, after a series of deaths in the Innu community of Natuashish.

“I thought they were going to join us,” Gregory Rich said of the federal government.

Read More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/ottawa-out-innu-foster-care-inquiry-1.4401558

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